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Not Very Presidential, Guys

Allegations of misleading advertising and questionable products follow four GOP candidates into tonight's debate.

| Jason Bagley

The first Republican presidential primary debate is tonight and TINA.org has got dirt on four of the 10 invited guests. One candidate has had to answer to allegations of misleading advertising while the other three have lent their names to questionable products unbecoming of presidential hopefuls. Since he’s all anyone ever wants to talk about these days, we’ll start with the man leading the polls:

1. Donald Trump

The real estate mogul has been named as the defendant in two lawsuits accusing his eponymous and now-shuttered Trump University of misleading thousands of students into believing that the institution — which lacked the required license to call itself a university — would reveal Trump’s “insider success secrets.” Students paid thousands of dollars to learn these secrets but when classes ended said The Donald’s secrets remained his own. More recently, Trump has made more than $1.3 million giving speeches for ACN, an Multilevel Marketing – a way of distributing products or services in which the distributors earn income from their own retail sales and from retail sales made by their direct and indirect recruits. that has faced allegations of operating as a pyramid scheme, according to The Wall Street Journal.

2. Mike Huckabee

Facing increasing criticism over his former role as a paid spokesman for the Diabetes Solution Kit, the former Arkansas governor has attempted to distance himself from the diabetes “cure” while on the campaign trail. “…I don’t have to defend everything that I have ever done,” Huckabee told Bob Schieffer on Face the Nation in May, shortly after announcing his candidacy for the White House. The kit claims to “reverse diabetes in as little as four weeks” and includes a shopping list of sorts for homemade supplements.

3. Rand Paul 

The U.S. Senator from Kentucky was left squinting at the southern sun after Ray-Ban informed his presidential campaign that it was selling its shades online without the company’s consent. The so-called Rand-Ban sunglasses had imprinted the “Rand” logo on the frame and sold them for donations at $150 a pop. “After a formal request from us, they promptly removed the product from their site and agreed to cease any further use of our trademarks,” a Ray-Ban spokeswoman told The Hill.

4. Ben Carson

Huckabee isn’t the only GOP presidential hopeful reluctant to talk about past endorsement deals. Carson, a former neurosurgeon, has also shied away from inquiries into questionable products that he once endorsed. Carson went to bat for Mannatech, an Multilevel Marketing – a way of distributing products or services in which the distributors earn income from their own retail sales and from retail sales made by their direct and indirect recruits. that agreed to pay $4 million in customer restitution after the Texas attorney general charged the company with pushing “exaggerated” health claims in an effort to boost supplement sales.

Use your discretion, Ted Cruz.

Jason Bagley

Jason Bagley, writer at TINA.org, is still romantic about journalism and believes in its power to educate and inform.

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