Ad Alert

Pure Caralluma Extract

Is there a doctor in the house?

Ad Alert

Pure Caralluma Extract

The doctors edited

This website that poses as the homepage for the talk show “The Doctors” — but in reality is an online ad for the dietary supplement Pure Caralluma Extract — has got it all: A before-and-after weight-loss photo (see below) that appears stolen from this woman’s Facebook page, suspect endorsements from Oprah and the embattled Dr. Oz (who’s quoted, “The Magic Weight Loss Cure for Every Body Type”) and a “special coupon” that — as luck would have it — expires today (!).

The Doctors 5

A reader recently alerted TINA.org to the website saying that he received a link to it from a friend whose email was hacked. In the course of our review, a message from our browser warned that the site had been reported as a A method of tricking consumers into handing over their personal information by posing as a legitimate entity. website designed to trick us into giving away sensitive information. Add to that the fact that all the hyperlinks under “The Doctors” header, including “Episodes” and “Be On the Show,” link to an order page for Pure Caralluma Extract, and there is plenty of reason to be suspicious.

A look at the website’s terms and conditions raised further concerns about this so-called “miracle pill” promising “rapid belly melt without diet and exercise.” In addition to the usual “results not typical” disclaimer tucked away in this section, there are details on all the hoops you have to jump through if you want a refund, including that the bottle cannot be “opened or used,” and that you have to pay a return shipping and a $5 restocking fee.

Check with your doctor before taking any supplement. And watch out for those websites pretending to be something they are not.

Click here for more of our coverage on these types of ads.


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