Several false advertising class-action lawsuits have been filed regarding the marketing of Ricola throat and cough products. More information on each lawsuit is below.

Case Name
(Date)
Product(s) Allegations

(Status/Outcome)

Cowitt et al. v. Ricola USA Inc.
24-cv-734, D. Conn.
(April 2024)
Ricola Original Herb Cough Drops Misleadingly representing that herb ingredients grown in the Swiss Alps provide the advertised therapeutic benefits when the active ingredient is menthol, which is derived from herbs grown in India

(Pending)

Wilmot et al. v. Ricola USA, Inc.
23-cv-1709, M.D. Fla.
(Sept. 2023)
Ricola Nasal Care Lozenges Misleadingly marketing lozenges as “Nasal Care” products that “cool[] passage[]” and “sooth[] nose[s]” when the active ingredient (menthol) does not relieve nasal symptoms and they do not contain any nasal decongestant active ingredients

Misleadingly marketing lozenges as “Max Strength” when they provide less menthol per drop than the FDA allows and there’s no scientific evidence showing that the amount of menthol in them provides more therapeutic benefit than products with less menthol

(Pending)

Jordan et al. v. Ricola USA, Inc.
23-cv-3212, C.D. Ill.
(June 2023)
Ricola Original and Mixed Berry Lozenges Falsely marketing that herb ingredients provide the advertised therapeutic benefits when the only active ingredient is menthol

(Pending)

Prescott et al. v. Ricola USA, Inc.
23-cv-2983, N.D. Cal.
(June 2023)
Ricola Original and Mixed Berry Lozenges Falsely marketing that herbs provide the advertised therapeutic benefits when the only active ingredient is menthol

(Pending)

Singo et al. v. Ricola USA, Inc.
22-cv-10369, S.D.N.Y.
(Dec. 2022)
Ricola Green Tea with Echinacea Throat Drops Misleadingly marketing products as if green tea and echinacea flower are active ingredients when both are inactive ingredients and menthol is the active ingredient that suppresses coughs

(Dismissed When a complaint is dismissed without prejudice, an amended version of the complaint can be refiled.)

Davis et al. v. Ricola USA, Inc.
22-cv-3071, C.D. Ill.
(May 2022)
Ricola Original Herb Cough Drops Misleadingly representing that herbs provide the therapeutic effect when none of the herbs are active ingredients

(Pending)

Comfort et al. v. Ricola USA, Inc.
19-cv-6089, W.D.N.Y.
(Feb. 2019)
Ricola Herb Throat Drops Falsely advertising products as natural

(Voluntarily dismissed When a complaint is dismissed with prejudice, it cannot be refiled.)

Minker et al. v. Ricola USA, Inc.
15-cv-9014, S.D.N.Y.
(Nov. 2015)
Ricola Herb Drops Falsely advertising products as natural

(Dismissed When a complaint is dismissed without prejudice, an amended version of the complaint can be refiled.)


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