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Nerium Skincare’s Outlandish Drug Claims

Don't throw away your prescriptions just yet.

Ad Alert

Nerium Skincare’s Outlandish Drug Claims

A TINA.org reader alerted us to questionable health claims being made by Nerium Skincare (not to be confused with the Texas-based Multilevel Marketing – a way of distributing products or services in which the distributors earn income from their own retail sales and from retail sales made by their direct and indirect recruits. Nerium International, which has recently changed its name to Neora). And boy was this consumer right. Nerium Skincare is selling three products that it refers to as its “NeriumRX Therapy Collection” – Psoriasis Relief Therapy, Cold Sore Dual Treatment and Dermal Pain Relief Therapy – which it claims, among other things, to:

  • Restore skin integrity (Psoriasis Relief)
  • Repair damaged skin (Psoriasis Relief, Dermal Pain Relief)
  • Effective pain reliever (Cold Sore Dual Treatment)
  • Enhanced healing (Cold Sore Dual Treatment, Dermal Pain Relief)
  • Anti-viral support (Cold Sore Dual Treatment)
  • Effective shingles pain reliever (Dermal Pain Relief)
  • Immuno-regulating support (Psoriasis Relief, Cold Sore Dual Treatment and Dermal Pain Relief)

But before you consider throwing your prescriptions away, a word of caution – marketing such products as having the ability to treat, cure, alleviate the symptoms of, or prevent developing diseases is simply not permitted by law. If a skincare product really could do all that, then it would be a drug subject to rigorous study and testing to gain FDA approval. Despite the fact that Nerium refers to its products as “drugs” and throws around words like “treatment cream,” “Dermatologist Tested,” “FDA-registered,” and “Produced in accordance to FDA Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) guidelines,” don’t be misled by its deceptive marketing message.

For more on TINA.org’s coverage of skincare products, click here.


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